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06 Dec

Yet other variants have involved mention of a Nigerian prince or other member of a royal family seeking to transfer large sums of money out of the country—thus, these scams are sometimes called "Nigerian Prince emails".

While Nigeria is most often the nation referred to in these scams, they may originate in other nations as well.

If a victim makes the payment, the fraudster either invents a series of further fees for the victim, or simply disappears.

While Nigeria is most often the nation referred to in these scams, they originate in other nations as well.

An advance-fee scam is a form of fraud and one of the most common types of confidence trick.

The scam typically involves promising the victim a significant share of a large sum of money, in return for a small up-front payment, which the fraudster requires in order to obtain the large sum.

An email subject line may say something like "From the desk of barrister [Name]", "Your assistance is needed", and so on.

The details vary, but the usual story is that a person, often a government or bank employee, knows of a large amount of unclaimed money or gold which he cannot access directly, usually because he has no right to it.

To get the process started, the scammer asked for a few sheets of the company’s letterhead, bank account numbers, and other personal information.Other official-looking letters were sent from a writer who said he was a director of the state-owned Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation.He said he wanted to transfer million to the recipient’s bank account – money that was budgeted but never spent.Some victims even believe they can cheat the other party, and walk away with all the money instead of just the percentage they were promised.The essential fact in all advance-fee fraud operations is the promised money transfer to the victim never happens, because the money does not exist.